GTranslate

Programming

 

Free Fonts

 

 

Dichtung

Regular

SimonettaExt

Regular

Gentium BasicExt

Regular

 

Bold

 

Italic

Italic

 

Black

 

Bold

 

Bold

DichtungAlt

Regular

 

Bold Italic

 

Bold Italic

 

Bold

 

Black

 

 

 

Black

 

Black Italic

 

 

DitungDitungAlt

SimonettaExt

Gentium BasicExt

                                  

 

The Fraktur font and its variant might be described as “new” recreations; however, they will necessarily look in many ways very much like other electronic emulations of the long-extant, original, hot-metal typeface they seek to recreate. In this way, they cannot be original works, but must simply be new scripts that attempt to recreate the "performance" of an age-old design.

The two extensions to existing font families, SimonettaExt from Simonetta, and Gentium BasicExt from Gentium Basic were done in order to obtain all the characters in the form needed for some Roman-script based texts I have been working on, I have had to extend some fonts so that they would have them.

The fonts edited in this way have had licenses that allow these edits and extensions, and, in keeping with the generous nature of those providing those fonts under those conditions, I offer here my extended versions of those fonts to the public.

 

All these fonts are covered by the SIL Open Font License (ver. 1.1), which means they are freely available for private or commercial use. They can also be edited, provided that any resultant fonts have names that differ both from the original font, and from any available derivatives, particularly when they appear as webfonts.

The webfont kits whose zip-files are available on each font's page were created using the free web-utility proved by FontSquirrel. I have edited the css files that this utility generates to organize the individualized webfonts into font families that can be used more easily within css-formatting directives.

Although these fonts (as TTFs or as webfonts) are perfectly usable for high-resolution rendering, no explicit hinting instructions have been applied to make them consistently well-renderable on lower resolution video or graphics devices.: individual results may vary, depending on a multitude of situations. Note also that on some operating systems, the font-rendering engine of the windowing front-end does a rough rendering of the glyphs for quick presentation of text, then  will later, as processing load allows, go back and massage the cached bitmaps in order to smooth their rendered outlines. (The higher the resolution of the device, the less this is a noticeable concern. These fonts look extremely good even within the FireFox browser on my Android/Samsung phone.)

The font metrics within these derivative fonts may differ slightly from their original versions, so it’s best not to mix the two sets without first understanding how this may cause differences in output, particularly on lower-resolution display devices.

The majority of glyphs contained within these new versions of the fonts are outside the “Windows 1252 (Western European)” range, so there are various ways of accessing those characters.

The simplest way is to use those characters in the script your computer is set up for, if that script uses Roman characters outside Windows 1252. For others, specifically for those in an English-language locale, there are a few, other options:

  • The best way is to install a keyboard layout that will allow easy/easier access to those characters. There are ones available from Microsoft, ones that have the additional characters on keyboard layouts defined by localized-keyboard manufacturers.
    I’ve created, and made avail
    able here, additional Windows keyboard layouts that will do this, usable whatever your input language-locale, subject only to whether you have a version of Windows that supports multiple-language input.

  • The next way is to use the CharMap utility shipped with Windows, or to download something like the BabelMap utility, to select the character(s) you want and insert them from within those applications.

  • The last way is Microsoft Office specific. And that is to enter the Unicode codepoint for the character you want, position the cursor just to the left of the final digit and press alt-x. (You will have to leave a space between the start of the Unicode codepoint value and any preceding digit or an a, b, c, d, e or f, or the application will parse a value that includes all preceding hexadecimal letters, and display the wrong character.)

The problem with this last method is that Microsoft Word (in particular; tested through ver. 2007) fails to use the current font of the text, and goes out to the font cache to find a character to match that Unicode codepoint. The problem is that if you have East Asian language support installed, the character ALWAYS comes back as Korean, no matter what script it may actually belong to! So you will have to hard-reformat that part of the text—Word’s format painter won’t work on this, but will leave the character formatted in the Korean-language font SimSun.

 

 

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